New Blog Defaults Updated

I’ve had a couple of requests to update my New Blog Defaults plugin for WPMU. I finally got around to doing it. Here are the new features:

The ability to close comments on the first post and page.

The plugin has long had the ability to set the blog’s default comment status. But, because the about page and the hello world post are created before the New Blog Defaults code is run, those two items weren’t affected. I could have just checked to see if you have the default status set as closed, then those items should have a status that matches. But, ultimately, I like to make my plugins as flexible as possible. So, now you can control each of those settings yourself.

New Blog Defaults Close Comments Options

New Blog Defaults Close Comments Options

Adding User to Other Blogs

This request came from the BBPress world. If you have BBPress installed on a specific blog, you need everyone to be on that blog as a subscriber. While this plugin won’t go through your existing user list and add them to a blog, and it won’t add people that just sign up without creating a blog, it will add users that both sign up and create a blog to the blog or blogs of your choice. You can set the role you’d like them to have as well. Personally, I think this is probably better handled in a separate plugin that fires on user add – not on blog creation. But, it’s not difficult to add it here.  And, it might be useful for those BuddyPress installs where people are limited to a single blog and always get a blog on signup.

New Blog Defaults Add User Options.

New Blog Defaults Add User Options.

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WPMU Plugin Stats Plugin Released

Best practice for upgrading plugins has always been to first deactivate the plugin, upgrade, and then reactivate the plugin. For site admins of WPMU sites, this is a laborious process, partly because you’d need to go through each blog to determine whether or not the plugin has been activated. This plugin provides a snapshot view of which blogs are using any particular plugin.

View of Admin Screen

View of Admin Screen

For sites that are using Plugin Commander to manage plugins, additional columns for the Plugin Commander settings of Auto Activate and User Controlled are included.

View of Admin Screen with Plugin Commander Installed

View of Admin Screen with Plugin Commander Installed

For sites that are using Plugin Manager, additional columns for the Plugin Manager settings of Auto Activate, User Controlled and Supporter Controlled are included.

View of Admin Screen with Plugin Manager Installed

View of Admin Screen with Plugin Manager Installed

Data is regenerated on viewing the plugin stats page if the data is more than one hour old. Data can be regenerated anytime via the “Regenerate” button (as seen in the above screen shot).

Grab the code from wordpress.org. Enjoy!

WPMU Theme Usage Info Plugin

WPMU has two ways to activate themes – either sitewide, or on a blog-by-blog basis. But, there’s no convenient way built-in to know which themes are actually being used, or by whom. This plugin addresses that issue by creating a “Theme Usage Info” sub-menu of the Site Admin menu. Included on the page are two tables of data – one of themes currently being used, and one of themes not currently being used. The currently used themes table provides information on how many blogs are using the theme, which blogs are using it, and whether or not the theme is currently activated site-wide. The table of unused themes provides information on whether the theme is currently activated sitewide.

adminview3

In addition, site admins can choose to provide this information to their users via a toggle on the administration page.

adminview4

If enabled, users will be able to view data on theme usage in Appearance -> themes for every theme except the currently activated theme. A single line of text is added just before the activate link indicating how many blogs are currently using the theme:

userview1

When clicked, a scrolling list of themes is displayed in a thickbox:

userview2

Download the code from wpmudev.org.

Thanks go out to Ron and Andrea for their prior work in this area.